Brief history of Paul L. Millar’s service in the military:

By Paul Miller

I was draft age when the Korean conflict started and decided to join the USS Naval reserve since I was in college and did not want to be drafted. My enlistment was for six years.

In the summer 1952 I was called up to report to the Great Lakes Naval training center for boot camp. I spent 8 weeks in boot camp and then selected to attend electrician’s mate school also located at Great Lake training center. Since the training center is along Lake Michigan, fall and winter was a cold 16 weeks spent there.

When I graduated I was promoted to 1st class seaman electrician mate and assigned to the USS Hopi operating out of Newport, Rhode Island.

The USS Hopi ATF 71

Screen Shot 2013-11-04 at 7.54.21 PM

Propulsion diesel-electric, four General Motors 12-278A diesel main engines driving four General Electric generators and three General Motors 3-268A auxiliary seNices engines, single screw, 3,600shp

During WW II Hopi was involved with many naval operations in the Atlantic theater including D-day.

Hopi received four battle stars for World War II service.

In the 1950’s Hopi resumed her operations along the East Coast, performing towing and salvage services in Newfoundland and the Caribbean as well. She thus contributed to the operating efficiency of the fleet in its important peace-keeping operations. Hopi decommissioned at New London 9 December 1955 and joined the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. She was turned over to the Maritime Administration 27 March 1962 and moved to the National Defense Reserve Fleet, James River, Va., where she remains, following permanent transfer to the Maritime Administration 1 July 1963, into 1967

I served on the Hopi from March 1953 through June 1954 when I was released from active duty so I could return to school in the fall of 1954. I am proud to have served my committed and was discharged in 1956.

I am proud to have served my country and also thankful for having the GI bill available for my education.

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