BRAT TIME STORIES: Terry Groves: Hair

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-893zj-ffe62e

Canadian Brat author Terry Groves shares another childhood memory. Check out Terry’s  Facebook https://www.facebook.com/TerryGrovesAuthor and blog at www.beingabrat.com

This podcast is brought to you by the Museum of the American Military Family & Learning Center. We are located in Tijeras, NM just east of Albuquerque. We collect stories in a variety of formats. Check us out, and if you’re interested, send us a story…or two…or three! We will accept short video or audio files, as well as written posts for our blogs. Query us or send a written story to: mamfwriter@gmail.com

Audio Podcasts: Together We Serve: “Service” stories from Brats, Vets, Spouses & Others, Schooling With Uncle Sam: Teachers & Students talk about their DOD school stories, America Remembers ‘Nam: Veterans and their families share their thoughts on Vietnam, Brat Time Stories: Can’t sleep? Check out our middle-of-the-night bedtime stories, written by, about and for the insomniac Brat

Video Podcasts:  One Takes: Like the name implies, people share their stories in a short, unedited format, Kitchen Table Convos: The best conversations happen around the kitchen table,  At Ease!  Arts, Entertainment, Literature & Travel-there’s a little something for everyone…Our Blogs:

At Ease: Books & More for Brats and their families, We Served Too

Passports & Pedagogy: Schooling with Uncle Sam; The American Military Family

Letters Home, America Remembers ‘Nam, MAMF Projects

 The museum’s podcasts are supported, in part by New Mexico Arts, the New Mexico Humanities Council, Sandia Area Credit Union and organizations like Military Brat Seal and Military Brats Registry.


AUDIO ONLY: AT EASE: Brat Author Shermaine Perry-Knights

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-kehha-1009e35

MAMF Storyteller Cherie Avila and MAMF Director Circe speak with Brat author Shermaine Perry-Knights about her series of books geared towards military kids. Check out: I Move a Lot and That’s Okay , her website and social media

To read how to make a photo book in PowerPoint, check out this link.

This podcast is brought to you by the Museum of the American Military Family & Learning Center. We are located in Tijeras, NM just east of Albuquerque. We collect stories in a variety of formats. Check us out, and if you’re interested, send us a story…or two…or three! We will accept short video or audio files, as well as written posts for our blogs. Query us or send a written story to: mamfwriter@gmail.com

Audio Podcasts: Together We Serve: “Service” stories from Brats, Vets, Spouses & Others, Schooling With Uncle Sam: Teachers & Students talk about their DOD school stories, America Remembers ‘Nam: Veterans and their families share their thoughts on Vietnam, Brat Time Stories: Can’t sleep? Check out our middle-of-the-night bedtime stories, written by, about and for the insomniac Brat

Video Podcasts:  One Takes: Like the name implies, people share their stories in a short, unedited format, Kitchen Table Convos: The best conversations happen around the kitchen table,  At Ease!  Arts, Entertainment, Literature & Travel-there’s a little something for everyone…Our Blogs:

At Ease: Books & More for Brats and their families, We Served Too

Passports & Pedagogy: Schooling with Uncle Sam; The American Military Family

Letters Home, America Remembers ‘Nam, MAMF Projects

 The museum’s podcasts are supported, in part by New Mexico Arts, the New Mexico Humanities Council, Sandia Area Credit Union and organizations like Military Brat Seal and Military Brats Registry.

 


AT EASE: Brat Author Shermaine Perry-Knights

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-k9f42-1009e0f

MAMF Storyteller Cherie Avila and MAMF Director Circe speak with Brat author Shermaine Perry-Knights about her series of books geared towards military kids. Check out: I Move a Lot and That’s Okay , her website and social media

To read how to make a photo book in PowerPoint, check out this link.

This podcast is brought to you by the Museum of the American Military Family & Learning Center. We are located in Tijeras, NM just east of Albuquerque. We collect stories in a variety of formats. Check us out, and if you’re interested, send us a story…or two…or three! We will accept short video or audio files, as well as written posts for our blogs. Query us or send a written story to: mamfwriter@gmail.com

Audio Podcasts: Together We Serve: “Service” stories from Brats, Vets, Spouses & Others, Schooling With Uncle Sam: Teachers & Students talk about their DOD school stories, America Remembers ‘Nam: Veterans and their families share their thoughts on Vietnam, Brat Time Stories: Can’t sleep? Check out our middle-of-the-night bedtime stories, written by, about and for the insomniac Brat

Video Podcasts:  One Takes: Like the name implies, people share their stories in a short, unedited format, Kitchen Table Convos: The best conversations happen around the kitchen table,  At Ease!  Arts, Entertainment, Literature & Travel-there’s a little something for everyone…Our Blogs:

At Ease: Books & More for Brats and their families, We Served Too

Passports & Pedagogy: Schooling with Uncle Sam; The American Military Family

Letters Home, America Remembers ‘Nam, MAMF Projects

 The museum’s podcasts are supported, in part by New Mexico Arts, the New Mexico Humanities Council, Sandia Area Credit Union and organizations like Military Brat Seal and Military Brats Registry.

 


WANDERLUST

Growing up, moving around

From state to state, not town to town.

At least every two to three years

Packing up, shifting gears.

Hopefully, you got your 1st choice

More often than not you had no voice.

If you were lucky you shipped out overseas

A new culture, new ways, new things to see.

A new history for you, new traditions in store

And the BRAT in you grew up craving more.

Some of us lucky and stayed over there

Some went and came back and settled elsewhere.

You learned early on not to let your roots thrive

Sure enough if you did, new orders would arrive.

Where to this time? Another great place?

Or returning somewhere you’d held in distaste?

Not that it mattered, your voice merely a noise

Which you kept to yourself at your parents’ choice.

You went where told with a smile on your face

Especially hard leaving old friends, some never to be replaced.

Some of us joined, or married back into the life

And some went civi, dare I say with some strife?

No matter the road we took after all

Some wanderlust in us all still continues to call…

–Karen Teich Cluster  3-27-21  COPR

(Daughter of CW4 Henry W. Teich Jr., US ARMY Helicopter Pilot, Korea and 2 Tours in Viet Nam)

*****SHARING is encouraged but MUST include my name, date written, and COPR!  ************


Military Kid creates Military B.R.A.T. Podcast

Hello! My name is Averie Gannon, and I am the creator, writer, and host of the Military B.R.A.T. Podcast. Growing up, I lived in different parts of the United States, and was given the opportunity to live overseas in Japan for five years. Currently, I am  living in Virginia as a 10th grader. I love to share my passions, which  include film, travel, and business, to anyone who will listen!

As a young Military brat, I did not have many friends that were in my situation. It was not until I spent five years in Japan and attended schools on base did I really meet other children who understood the struggles and hardships of military life. When I came back to the states, I still felt this emotional rollercoaster. And since I didn’t have my military friends nearby to share my thoughts with, and with the general interest of my non-military friends, I eventually formulated the idea behind the podcast. 

It took lots of long hours of planning, since I wanted each episode to feel authentic and personal. So, after about 5 months of detailed planning, I was finally able to clue a few of my closest friends in on what I was spending all my time on. With their immense amounts of help and patience, the show was slowly born and turned into what you hear today! I couldn’t be here without them.

Being able to share my story is something I have always been grateful for. While my lifestyle may have brought on maturity quicker than most, it also gave me a chance to meet some amazing people and see things I could have never dreamed of. With Season One coming to a close,  I hope to dedicate season 2 to the lesser known parts of being a military child. I would like to touch on topics from mental health to family relations. I know these may be hard to talk about, but I aim to help kids feel less alone during their time as a military child, and sometimes all you need is someone who has felt the way you do as well. 

With that, I hope you all enjoy! You can find us on instagram, @militarybratpodcast and our website, www.militarybratpodcast.com for more details on the show and our episodes. 


BRAT TIME STORIES: Terry Groves-Cold Day in the Pl;ayground

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-s5ihc-ffe621

Canadian Brat author Terry Groves shares another childhood memory. Check out Terry’s  Facebook https://www.facebook.com/TerryGrovesAuthor and blog at www.beingabrat.com

This podcast is brought to you by the Museum of the American Military Family & Learning Center. We are located in Tijeras, NM just east of Albuquerque. We collect stories in a variety of formats. Check us out, and if you’re interested, send us a story…or two…or three! We will accept short video or audio files, as well as written posts for our blogs. Query us or send a written story to: mamfwriter@gmail.com

Audio Podcasts: Together We Serve: “Service” stories from Brats, Vets, Spouses & Others, Schooling With Uncle Sam: Teachers & Students talk about their DOD school stories, America Remembers ‘Nam: Veterans and their families share their thoughts on Vietnam, Brat Time Stories: Can’t sleep? Check out our middle-of-the-night bedtime stories, written by, about and for the insomniac Brat

Video Podcasts:  One Takes: Like the name implies, people share their stories in a short, unedited format, Kitchen Table Convos: The best conversations happen around the kitchen table,  At Ease!  Arts, Entertainment, Literature & Travel-there’s a little something for everyone…Our Blogs:

At Ease: Books & More for Brats and their families, We Served Too

Passports & Pedagogy: Schooling with Uncle Sam; The American Military Family

Letters Home, America Remembers ‘Nam, MAMF Projects

 The museum’s podcasts are supported, in part by New Mexico Arts, the New Mexico Humanities Council, Sandia Area Credit Union and organizations like Military Brat Seal and Military Brats Registry.


MAMF Military Child Picture Book Project

April is the month of the Military Child and the Museum of the American Military Family (MAMF) will be showcasing books by and for brats throughout the month. As part of our showcase, we want to honor the military child through the creation of picture books. During the month of April, we want to encourage you to make a picture book of your life as a military child, or the life of another military child. Once the book is complete, you can share it with your family and friends. Of course, the museum would love to have a copy and will be proud to preserve and display your story.

My name is Cheryl Avila, and I am the museum’s Storyteller. I have created a picture book on PowerPoint to show you how simple it can be. Click on this link to see the picture book I created to honor my brother, Karl Morton.

American Military Family Blog

If you would like to create your own picture book, start by collecting photos of the military child. If the images are already digital images, save them on a new folder on your desktop. If the images are not digital, you can take a picture of the photo with your camera and save it that way. If you have the capability to scan the photo, that would be good, too. You need at least twice as many photos as pages in your picture book.

Open a blank presentation on PowerPoint. 

For the cover of your book, include the name of the military child and perhaps a statement about the person. Click on New Slide for the pages of the book.

I used the “Two Content” option for most of the pages. If I only wanted one photo, I used the Title and Content slide.

Use the photo icon on the slide to insert a photo. You can add additional photos on the page by using the Insert tab and selecting Picture. 

I then added a sentence to each page explaining the photos. Since it is a picture book, I tried to keep the sentences simple. I then went to the Design tab and clicked on “Design Ideas.” 

I scrolled through the various design options until I found a design I liked for that page. Save your PowerPoint and it is ready to share. You can print your book or share over email.  It was that easy!

You can now share your picture book by attaching it to an email to your family and friends. You can also print out the book if you prefer a hard copy of your book. If you would like to share your picture book with MAMF, we would love your digital contribution to the museum. If you create your book using PowerPoint, it will need to be converted to a pdf to put on the MAMF website. To convert your ppt to a pdf for the museum, click on the down arrow in the box under the name of your file. A drop-down box will appear and click on PDF (*pdf).

Send your pdf to militaryfamilymuseum@comcast.net. Put “MAMF Military Child Picture Book” in the subject line of your email. Please put your name and contact information in the email. If you prefer printing your story, you can send it by mail to:

Museum of the American Military Family, 546B Road 333, Tijeras, NM 87059.

All of us at the museum look forward to seeing what you come up with!


Nuʻupia Ponds Wildlife Management Area- Marine Corps Base Hawaii

Having spent 30+ days at the on-base Marine Corps Inn during the Corona virus pandemic, and in a partial Restriction of Movement (ROM) I became very familiar the beaches and amenities on the base. The beaches were great, but my favorite spot by far was the trail through the Nu’upia Ponds Wildlife Management Area.

It was hard to believe I was on a military installation when I walked along the ponds—the giveaway was the huge chain-link fence topped with barbed wire that skirts the preserve. As long as I looked towards the water, it was easy to imagine I was in the wilderness. Having just come from New Mexico’s high desert, the marshes, mangroves and humidity were novel and exotic. 

According to an internet article written by Karen Bryan, about a thousand years ago, the Nuʻupia Ponds were created by native Hawaiians as part of a pond system to raise and harvest fish and other foods, like seaweed.

Today, the fishponds at Marine Corps Base Hawaii are a wetland refuge for native, endangered, and protected birds and Hawaiian green sea turtles. Throughout refuge,  informational signs describe the plants and animals that call the area home. 

Many people and organizations work together to maintain Nu’upia Ponds, and many base residents take advantage of having it close by. I walked along the causeway at least twice a day and often came across Scouts studying for badges, families looking for sea turtles and birds and tons of Marines doing PT. Volunteers remove various invasive plants at Nuʻupia Ponds and maintain the cleanliness of the area. 

Since moving into our big city quarters across the island, my husband and I make it a point to visit the ponds each time we go over to the base for errands or to go to the beach. It’s a chance to slow down and find a calm breathing space during the day on a very busy island.


GRAICE UNDER PRESSURE: Identity, Connie Kinsey

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-q3edr-ff6a4c

The museum will be focusing on a series of topics over the next year as part of our E Pluribus Unum-GRAICE Under Pressure project. Our Writers in Residence will examine and reflect on numerous topics pertaining to gender, religion, race, identity, culture and ethnicity. In addition to essays, our podcasts and YouTube videos will also examine what makes us–well, us. 

This podcast is brought to you by the Museum of the American Military Family & Learning Center. We are located in Tijeras, NM just east of Albuquerque. We collect stories in a variety of formats. Check us out, and if you’re interested, send us a story…or two…or three! We will accept short video or audio files, as well as written posts for our blogs. Query us or send a written story to: mamfwriter@gmail.com

Audio Podcasts: Together We Serve: “Service” stories from Brats, Vets, Spouses & Others, Schooling With Uncle Sam: Teachers & Students talk about their DOD school stories, America Remembers ‘Nam: Veterans and their families share their thoughts on Vietnam, Brat Time Stories: Can’t sleep? Check out our middle-of-the-night bedtime stories, written by, about and for the insomniac Brat

Video Podcasts:  One Takes: Like the name implies, people share their stories in a short, unedited format, Kitchen Table Convos: The best conversations happen around the kitchen table,  At Ease!  Arts, Entertainment, Literature & Travel-there’s a little something for everyone…Our Blogs:

At Ease: Books & More for Brats and their families, We Served Too

Passports & Pedagogy: Schooling with Uncle Sam; The American Military Family

Letters Home, America Remembers ‘Nam, MAMF Projects

 The museum’s podcasts are supported, in part by New Mexico Arts, the New Mexico Humanities Council, Sandia Area Credit Union and organizations like Military Brat Seal and Military Brats Registry.

 


MILITARY ID CARD CONTEST: Cindy Hayes

My First ID Card

            There were 8 kids standing in line to get their ID card photos taken that day and a baby in my mother’s arms.   This was our Yours, Mine and Ours family- 8 girls and one boy.  Three girls and the boy belonged to my stepdad and his ex-wife, and four girls were my mom’s and birth dad’s.  The baby belonged to my mom and stepdad. The two oldest girls, Barbara and I, got our pictures made individually.  The other 7 children’s photos were taken with my mom.  My mom had married a man in the US Air Force about a year and a half before and now we were all going to Germany. 

            As a self-conscious twelve-year-old, I remember standing in front of a screen and listening to the military photographer.  I so wanted to smile, but he told me not to.  I know that I look much better when I smile.  My blonde hair looked dark and so did my green eyes.  While completing the paperwork, my stepdad looked at that picture and asked me what color my hair was.  I sighed deeply and said, “blonde.” I never liked that black and white picture!  Maybe it was not the picture itself that I hated, but the change it represented.  

Even though my mom and stepdad had been married for a while, it was the first time I really felt like this was serious.  I had lived in San Antonio, Texas my whole life.  I had not traveled very much, so the realization that I would soon be leaving everything and everyone I knew hit me hard.  I did not want to leave my daddy.   Then, there were my grandparents and especially my grandmother, who I called Mungie.  I had spent almost every Saturday night and Sunday with her since I was a baby.  I even already had my first boyfriend, Danny, and I was close with his mom too.  

Since I was 13 when we left for Germany, I clearly remember saying goodbye to everyone at the airport.  We all hugged, cried, and hugged again.   I etched their faces into my memory and recorded their voices in my heart just in case something happened to them while we were gone.  I prayed that they would all be safe for the next three years.

My heart was beating like a drum and my chest felt like I had blown up about 50 balloons as I boarded the airplane for my first flight. The overnight flight went smoothly, until I ate the Salisbury steak dinner.  Mom gave me something to settle my stomach and I was fine after a while.  I remember landing at Rhein Main Airport.  

We got off the plane and walked toward the terminal, looking like a bunch of ducklings following their hen and drake.  It seemed like everyone was giggling and pointing at our little flock.  I was especially embarrassed and a little amused as we got on the shuttle to take us to our transport-we filled up every seat!  

We lived in Platen in Frankfurt in the temporary housing with 8 bedrooms for the next few months.  I finally had my dream, my own room.  Imagine the noise of all the kids playing and running up and down the hallway.  I was ecstatic! On the playground behind our apartment, I met older and more experienced dependent teenagers and quickly found out how sheltered I really was.  I grew up quickly. 

Then we moved to a large house on the German economy, and I realized that having an ID card really opened a lot of doors for me.  Even though I quickly made friends with some of my German neighbors, there were not any Americans living on our street.   We did, however, live closer to the PX and commissary, the theatre, high school, and the teen club.  I loved the freedom and autonomy I had to be able to walk to these places, meet my friends, and use my ID card to do fun things.  My sisters and I also used our ID cards to go to dances, go shopping, skating, and go to the movies.  I really feel that these outings helped us to get to know each other better.  

My mom and stepdad had two more children while we were in Germany-both were boys, bringing the total to eleven kids.  As the thirteen of us explored the beautiful German mountains, castles, and rivers, we became closer.  Our military blended, Yours, Mine, and Ours family finally became truly united.

Cindy Hayes