Such is the Power of Smell

by Circe Olson Woessner

This time of year, New Mexico is cloaked in a shroud of hazy wood smoke from hundreds of fireplaces. As I walk by certain houses, I smell creosote, or uncured wood, or the wonderful piñon—this is the smell of winter.

Cocooned under my thick down comforter, the smell of freshly brewed coffee wafting down the hallway is the thing that rousts me out of bed.

Smell is something that can transport us back to a particular space and time—to bad times and good.

When my son was six, we took him to see Jurassic Park at the post movie theater. Later that night, he came screaming into our bed; he was sweaty and trembling—and for the first time, I smelled terror. His entire body oozed it from every pore.

Veterans tell me that they remember vividly the odors of war—even 50 years back. Vietnam had its distinct smell. Read the rest of this entry »

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Brat Core Values

22491447_1458907674192288_4448919916439253608_nby Circe Olson Woessner

This summer, the museum started a new project, and to get inspiration, I went onto Facebook and asked Military Brats to write one word to define their core values. I would choose the top three for our “Brathood” installation. Not surprisingly, I got a lot of answers. “Diversity” popped up over and over, as did “tradition” and “resiliency.”

Resiliency struck a nerve to one Brat who said, “please don’t use ‘resiliency’ as a core value. It’s used too much and puts pressure on kids who have been asked over and over to be ‘resilient.’ Some of them just can’t be resilient any more…”

After several days, dozens of answers, and more than one spirited discussion, I selected the top three words Brats selected for their Core Values. They are: “Respect,” “Adaptability,” and “Pride”.

Here’s what Brats had to say about these words:

 RESPECT:

“Respect is a learned core value, instilled from Day One of our Brat lives. It permeated our lives as dependents, and hopefully, continues to our adult, non-Brat lives. It did with me.” Jill

“As a Brat, I was raised to respect others, as well as myself. From the ability to listen to another person’s point of view to the shine of my shoes, respect is a core value of mine. Not only do I give respect to others and their property, I expect it in return.” Sharyn

“Respect is woven throughout our lives as Brats. Respect for family, friends, community, the nation are formed with every encounter we make, and every transfer to a new location. With respect, we find acceptance for others, and the diversity that is part of the military experience.” Jennifer

Jim adds, “We had discipline/respect. Goof up bad and your dad got demoted or transferred…”

ADAPTABILITY

“To me, ‘adaptability’ comes first. Because of the 2-4 year transfers, you learned to adapt to different regions of the country and of the world at a very young age. For example, many Brats learned ‘yes’, ‘no’ and the numbers 1-10 (and more) in two languages before the age of 3.” Steven

Patt says, “I always felt ‘adaptability’ was my word. As a military child, I never gave moving every three years a second thought. I thought this is how the whole world did things. We moved, we set up a shiny new home, we made new friends quickly. Repeat, repeat, repeat. Oh, the places I have gone. The other word used for the military child is ‘resilient’. Words I try to live up to every day.”

PRIDE

There was some discussion of whether “Pride” and “Patriotism” were the same thing, but, ultimately “pride” won out. Overseas Brats founder Joe Condrill explains, “Many Military Brats identify “Pride” with “Patriotism.”  Pride is a deep-rooted feeling for a Military Brat. It is evoked when we see the flag flying or a member of the U.S. military in uniform.”

Pride is evident in Pegi’s answer, “I loved living on base where everyone stopped what they were doing at 5 pm to honor the flag and our anthem.  I was so lucky to grow up proud.”

Regina didn’t hold back when she discussed what the word “pride” meant to her: “I am so proud of our Brat family! We go through a lot, love a lot, and learn a lot.”

 Clare says, “I’m proud to be a Brat and all that entails, especially being an ambassador for the military and ‘your’ branch to civilians. After all, as my sister says, ‘this is the most exclusive club in the world – no amount of money or fame can get you in; you’re born into it, and bloom.’”

Steven sums it up, “Later [in life] I reflected on how happy, durable, inseparable, even tribal and resilient we young Brats were. We lost first loves, best friends, favorite schools, houses with our own rooms, warm neighbors, close family and so much more – on a regular basis – yet we thrived. A Brat life became part of our DNA.

These core values are woven into the fiber of military children across generations, and stays forever, as Army/Air Force Brat Debbie explains:

“Being born and raised a BRAT (Brave, Resilient, Adaptable, Tenacious) is at the very core of who I am. Without a doubt, these qualities were instilled in me –not only by the examples around me 24/7, living behind the barbwire, but also from my Brats. Best way these words describe the impact being a Brat has had on me was during a cancer diagnosis in my early 30’s as a young wife and mother of a small child. I was Brave because I had the ability to face the unknown head on, Resilient in my ability to withstand and bounce back, Adaptable when all my hair fell out – knowing that this, too, will pass, and Tenacious in the fight for my life. Brave, Resilient, Adaptable and Tenacious was our way of life as Brats and remembering that has served me well my entire life–all 60 years!”

While the words above are not “official” Brat Core Values, most Brats I spoke with agree that these words resonate with them.

As Bette puts it:

“We were taught them

We learned them

Therefore, we live them

They define us as Brats.”

 


MAMF is looking for the Following:

People often ask us what kinds of things we are looking for to put in the museum. Here’s a short list of items we’re focusing on right now:

•Plates, mugs, glasses from any military installation
•Collectible spoons that have different cities on the handles-both from US and overseas
•tees from military installations
•Food product boxes, cans, alcohol bottles ( empty) with labels that reflect the military. ( We are doing a new kitchen exhibit.)
•Military or patriotic Christmas tree ornaments
•DODDS, DODEA or International school memorabilia
•Beer Coasters from overseas
•Scrapbooking supplies- military & travel stickers, photo mounting tape, acid-free albums, etc.
•Military unit patches

Your tax deductible donation can be mailed to:

Museum of the American Military Family
PO Box 5085
Albuquerque, NM 87185

•We are also collecting written memory pieces from spouses and kids who were stationed in Bad Hersfeld or Fulda at any time. These can be emailed to us at:

MAMFwriter@gmail.com

Thank you for helping us grow!


Please support MAMF on CFC

The Museum of the American Military Family is part of the Combined Federal Campaign ( CFC). Our CFC number is 57056. Please consider supporting us on CFC.

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Support MAMF by becoming a member

For more info, click here

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In 1946, VA Voluntary Service was established as part of General Omar Bradley’s modernization of the Veterans Administration.

In June 1945, less than two months after Franklin D. Roosevelt’s death and Harry S. Truman assumed the presidency, he selected fellow Missourian General Omar Bradley to head the Veterans Administration. Bradley was confirmed and took his place at VA in August of that year. Bradley was charged with modernizing VA and he wasted no time in doing so.  He established a national chaplain service in November and after getting congressional approval to create a professional Department of Medicine and Surgery in January 1946, set out establish other vital services to improve care for veterans.  The Army had a long and successful record of working with volunteers and social organizations, and he knew that VA could benefit from coordinating volunteers at a national level, too.

The roots of large-scale volunteerism began during the Civil War.  Men, women, and children in both the Confederate and Union territories who could not fight in the war, volunteered to do anything needed to help soldiers and the war effort. In June 1861 President Lincoln authorized the U.S. Sanitary Commission, an entirely volunteer group from New York, to help the Union Army medical department and legions of short-term “volunteer” soldiers that were enlisting to fight in the war.  Local branches were established in many cities and “sanitary fairs” were held to raise money that bought ambulances, hospital ships, medical supplies, and personal items for wounded and convalescing soldiers. These volunteers documented burial locations for soldiers who died from their wounds, wrote letters to families, read to soldiers, and much more to comfort them or their families.image001

The U.S. Sanitary Commission was the largest national volunteer organization in American history at the time, igniting passions for those fighting the war and attracting thousands of volunteers like poet Walt Whitman, Clara Barton, and Frederick Law Olmsted to help them.  Service with the U.S. Sanitary Commission inspired many of its volunteers to continue the work after the war, resulting in numerous new social and veterans fraternal organizations.  The Grand Army of the Republic and American Red Cross are examples of Sanitary Commission spin-offs that were established after the war to provide services not only to veterans, but to their widows, families, and orphans, as well as immigrants and the poor. The U.S. Sanitary Commission played an essential role in proving the need for “soldiers homes” after the war that resulted in the establishment of the first federal institution in the world solely for disabled veterans of the “volunteer” forces in 1865.  That institution, initially known as the National Asylum for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, was the origins of what today is known as VA’s Veterans Health Administration.

1919_06_17_Red Cross to help find beneficiaries_TheSpokesman-Reviewp4 The passion for disabled soldiers and veterans, which sprang to life on a massive and national scale during the Civil War, became a new part of the American ethos, after the war, and VA and its predecessors were beneficiaries of that good will.  During World War I, the Treasury Department was tasked with providing medical care to World War I disabled veterans, through its Bureau of War  Risk Insurance(BWRI) and Public Health Service (PHS).  Surgeon General Rupert Blue asked the American Red Cross for help and their volunteers supplied a significant auxiliary workforce that ranged from filing clerks to nurses and social workers. The Red Cross provided the first organized coordination of volunteer services in federal veterans programs, but as the Veterans Bureau, and later the Veterans Administration, took over roles once done by the Red Cross, much of that was lost.

As the U.S. geared up to fight yet another war in 1941, volunteer organizations once again came to the aid of service men and women and VA. General Bradley knew very well the important role that volunteers played in maintaining morale and hope in his troops during the war and that they could do the same for them as veterans.  Bradley established a Special Services Division in 1946, just like Army had, which included a chaplain service, voluntary service coordination (VAVS), recreation service, and canteen service.  Establishing a national office with experienced staff to meet with leaders of volunteer and veterans organizations was a common-sense move that has seen VA’s volunteer program grow, professionally, over the past 70 years into one of the largest, most experienced, and respected corps of volunteers in the federal government.

While VAVS celebrates its 70th anniversary this year, it continues the work with veterans that began 155 years ago, and has found its own place in American history.  I dare say that the men and women of the U.S. Sanitary Commission would be most proud of their modern brothers and sisters caring for this generation of veterans.

VA Historian

 

 

 


MILITARY FAMILY MEMORIAL TO BE UNVEILED IN SANTA FE ON MAY 13

April 24, 2017

 For immediate release

 For additional information: Dr. Circe Olson Woessner, (505) 504-6830

MILITARY FAMILY MEMORIAL TO BE UNVEILED IN SANTA FE ON MAY 13

Museum of the American Military Family Partners with the New Mexico National Guard

“Because our military families are so diverse, when we started to design our memorial, we decided to use a house because no matter which generation or which branch of service, we all keep the home fires burning – home is where our hearts are,” Museum of the Military Family (MAMF) Executive Director Dr. Circe Olson Woessner says. “We are proud to have created such a unique memorial to the mothers and fathers, sons and daughters, spouses, and others who have loved and supported a member of the U.S. Armed Forces.”

The Military Family Memorial is possible because of a grant from the Kerr Foundation and the generosity of companies like Lowe’s, RAKS, and of the National Guard, veterans’ organizations, and many individuals, especially “members of our all-volunteer board of directors, and extended Facebook family.”

The memorial is a small house, designed by Woessner and configured for a static display of family memorabilia by Museum special projects manager Paul Silva, a Sandia National Laboratories retiree. Through each of five windows, visitors can look upon displays depicting the life of a military member, of children, of spouses.

The Memorial is located on the grounds of the New Mexico National Guard Museum (formerly the Bataan Memorial Museum) in Santa Fe. It will be dedicated on May 13 at 1:00 p.m. during a weekend Guard commemoration of the end of World War II in Europe.

Army veteran and graphic designer Dominic Ruiz created the panels. He said the monument would teach people about military life and allow individuals familiar with it to reminisce. “For me, it brought back a lot of memories,” Ruiz says.

Woessner says, “I don’t know if there are any other memorials dedicated to the military family and I am grateful that the National Guard leadership recognizes the family as an essential component of military service and supports having our memorial right at the entrance to their own museum.”

For more information about the Museum of the American Military Family, visit www.militaryfamilymuseum.org or write to Museum of the American Military Family, P.O. Box 5085, Albuquerque, NM 87185. Tel: (505) 504-6830.